Fàilte! (Welcome!)

Fàilte! (Welcome!)
This blog is the result of my ongoing research into the people, places and events that have shaped the Western Isles of Scotland and, in particular, the 'Siamese-twins' of Harris and Lewis.
My interest stems from the fact that my Grandfather was a Stornowegian and, until about four years ago, that was the sum total of my knowledge, both of him and of the land of his birth.
I cannot guarantee the accuracy of everything that I have written (not least because parts are, perhaps, pioneering) but I have done my best to check for any errors.
My family mainly lived along the shore of the Sound of Harris, from An-t-Ob and Srannda to Roghadal, but one family 'moved' to Direcleit in the Baighs...

©Copyright 2011 Peter Kerr All rights reserved

Wednesday, 18 August 2010

Kerr Occupations 1841-61 – A Regional Comparison

The figures in brackets are the number of Kerr folk found at each location:


1841

Harris (65)

Other Inverness (29)

Ross (28)

Argyll (192)

Sutherland (242)

Carpenter or Joiner

2

1

0

1

1

Mason

1

0

0

0

0

Shoemaker

2

1

0

5

0

Tailor

1

0

2

0

0

Weaver

0

0

0

1

1

(The one Tailor on Harris appears as a 'Tenant' on the census but I know my great, great, great grandfather
John was in fact a Tailor at this time – it demonstrates that this data is subject to all manner of 'noise' – and the same is true of the one Mason who was Peter, the Dry Mason who moved to
Argyll between 1851 and 1861)


1851

Harris

Other Inverness (46)

Ross (23)

Argyll (255)

Sutherland (171)

Carpenter or Joiner

2

0

0

4

1

Mason

1

0

0

2

0

Shoemaker

2

0

0

4

0

Tailor

1

0

1

0

0

Weaver

1

0

0

2

0

(Also a 'Teacher of English' on Barra and a Farmer's Widow in Borve)



1861 (52)



Harris

Other Inverness (69)

Ross (43)

Argyll (251)

Sutherland (225)

Carpenter

1

0

0

1

0

Mason

0

0

0

1 (b. Harris)

0

Shoemaker

2

0

0

1

1

Tailor

1

0

0

1

1

Weaver

2

0

0

1

0

I think it is clear that the concentration of these particular occupations in the small population on Harris demonstrates a cluster compared to the wider region.

The table also suggests that, if these records in any way can be used to reveal a trail left as crafts were passed from father to son (although I have included one Weaveress from 1861!) then Argyll is the most likely source for that trail.

I know this contradicts my recent focus upon Sutherland but I hope it also demonstrates why I am looking
outside Inverness and Ross as likely origins for the Harris folk?

My quest continues...

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